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Enhanced coroner training to help put opioid crisis into remission


At a joint legislative committee meeting Wednesday at the Statehouse Convention Center, Arkansas lawmakers saw death investigation improvements have been made over the years, but much more work still needs to be done.


By Jessi Turnure
Fox 16 News

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — It's been seven years since overnight flooding at the Albert Pike Campground killed 20 people.

The tragedy shined a spotlight on the need for improved coroner training and education in the state.

At a joint legislative committee meeting Wednesday at the Statehouse Convention Center, Arkansas lawmakers saw death investigation improvements have been made over the years, but much more work still needs to be done.

Another tragedy spilling across the country into the Natural State made that very clear.

"People are dying every day from drug overdoses," said Dr. William Mason, the associate director for preparedness and science with the Arkansas Department of Health. "It kind of was a slow tsunami, and it's now here."

However, a new state law could help put the crisis into remission.

"The coroner's bill is unique to Arkansas," Mason said. "It came at the right time."

The legislation established a fund to allow coroners to improve their training.

Click here to read more of the story and to watch the video report.

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